Where you live can be putting you at risk.


 


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Landlords
Find out what you can do here.
Tenants
Find out what you can do here.

 


Surgeon General's Report 2006

Secondhand Smoke Transfer in Multiunit Housing: Nicotine & Tobacco Research, V12, N11

If you live in an apartment, you’re sharing more than just laundry rooms and mailboxes. You’re sharing air. If someone is smoking, that smoke cannot be controlled by fans, ventilation, or separating smokers. Secondhand smoke can travel through air ducts, stairways, walls, and floors into your rooms. That smoke can cause heart attacks, cancer, and is especially harmful to children.

Landlords can promote the health of their tenants by making their buildings smoke-free. They will also save the time and money it takes to clean smoky apartments.  



Study Shows Positive Effects of Smoke-free Policy
A recent study published in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease looked at the effects on residents after a smoke-free policy was implemented in a Colorado public housing authority. The study found decreases in the number and percentage of smokers who smoked every day and the number of cigarettes smoked per day. Thirty percent of residents who smoked had quit smoking 15 months after policy implementation. The percentage of residents who smelled secondhand smoke indoors declined significantly, and a significant decrease in breathing problems was found after policy implementation as well.